Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Supervisors Should Learn about Withdrawal Symptoms--They Can Be More Threatening

 
Supervisors and managers overseeing line staff workers learn how to effectively identify specific signs and symptoms of drug and alcohol abuse, and I recommend without reservation that they also learn about withdrawal symptoms associated with non-use, that are crucial to documenting what appears to dysfunctional behavior on the job. 

This is a twist on typical reasonable suspicion training, but we believe highly important. Although seldom discussed, drug addicts and alcoholics in middle and late stages may appear without any symptoms whatsoever until they go into withdrawal, at which point they may become highly dysfunctional.


Properly confronting employees does not mean that you get into conflicts with them on the job, but supervisors must know what their leverage is so they can properly motivate the workers found to be potentially under the influence to accept a referral. This free reasonable suspicion training checklist will help. I am only supplying the first page of it here, but you willreasonable-suspicion-training4.jpg find the full product on the shopping cart here.

Monday, June 5, 2017

New Supervisor Skills: First-Time Supervisors and Skills for Leadership


Becoming a supervisor is an exciting promotion, but it comes with a new set of challenges in the workplace. Rising to these challenges will allow you to love your job and failure to do so will create enormous strain. No matter how long you have been a supervisor, refresher courses (small intense courses packed with information that’s practical and instantly applicable) can help you perform your job better. This sort of intense training can help you feel more prepared for any situation that may arise when you are out there on the job. These skills generally fall into the communication camp, because in most cases that is the defining factor of good management. Whether you see to help prevent workplace violence, give feedback, inspire your team, or even apply documentation skills, the underlying skill is good communication. Read more... https://www.facebook.com/reasonablesuspiciontraining/posts/1693318880697361

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

During a DOT supervisor training course, supervisors learn about the signs and symptoms of alcohol misuse and the signs and symptoms of drug abuse so they can spot these behaviors on the job when employees experience them.
Although supervisors are not able determine with finality whether an employee is under the influence, the education provided to supervisors allows them to document contemporaneously all the information needed to suspect that drugs and alcohol are being consumed, or consumed before starting work....READ MORE

Friday, April 21, 2017

Drugs of Abuse Chart for DOT Supervisor Training

I hope most drug and alcohol training programs provide a drugs of abuse chart for supervisors to look and discuss in their DOT compliance training classes. The drugs of abuse chart typically shows the five classifications of drugs and alcohol that the DOT requires to be examined by supervisors to help them learn about the nature of these substances, their effects on work performance, and the behavior of employees, signs and symptoms of their use, and the risks the substances pose in the work environment.

This chart should be editable and it should change over time with the discovery of new drugs of abuse that could find their way into the workplace. Employees these days have many sneaky ways of bring drugs into workplace, here is an example of a crack pipe we show in our DOT Supervisor Training PowerPoint and other training formatted courses.


DOT Supervisor Training PowerPoint for Reasonble Suspicion













Pretty crazy, huh? And this crack pipe is only a small example of the types of devices that are produced to thwart detection by management and provide reasonable suspicion training.

There are many other examples of how drug use is snuck into companies. I also have an image of a Chapstick that is really also a crack pipe. When all these clever tricks exist, there is only one thing supervisors can do about it -- monitor performance effectively. The drugs of abuse chart can help, but don't be fooled, good old fashioned observation of behaviors on the job is the way to go.

So, sure, knowing all these devices of trickery is a good thing for awareness, but none of it substitutes for a really solid drugs of abuse chart where supervisors can learn about the behavior of employees and how to be healthy.

Supervisor should be educated about other drugs of abuse like Salvia and K2. When supervisor training refresher is done, ask them to update their own charts with the drug and alcohol training they receive. And, as I mentioned before, do not omit employee education about substance abuse. Employees are your eyes and ears. They will let you know by one means or another, what is going on in the organization. But you are going to need to engage with them until they trust you. At that point, they will stop dropping hints about the work culture and what risks exist within it.