Friday, August 11, 2017

Do you provide education and awareness to employees concerning alcohol and other drugs of abuse?

drugs of abuse education for employees
There are powerful reasons for doing so, and they are all a win-win for employees and employers.

There is no government mandate for most industries to do employee awareness training in substance abuse (railroads have had such a mandate since 1986.) but I want to give you several reasons why you should consider it no matter what industry your associated with.

Employees deserve it. There is a terrible opioid crisis going on right now, alcoholism is never going away, pot use is increasing, and employees and their families are terribly affected by these problems.

You may not hear about the brother of your lead supervisor who is addicted to heroin or the sister of your secretary who moved into a homeless shelter last month, but these issues are pervasive in every company.

Employees may see TV commercials, or even hear the President of the United States talk about drug problems, but they aren't getting education about these issues from any source at home or in the community. Workplace wellness programming that you can easily provide is really the only way they can get it.

They can't get it anywhere. Employees aren't getting information about substance and prevention from TV shows or newspapers. They aren't learning about alcohol abuse, dealing with teens, stimulants, opioids, depressants, marijuana dangers, enabling, getting help, helping someone who doesn't want help, self-diagnosis, dispelling myths, and many more topics. (We cover all these things in our training program for employee drug and alcohol awareness.)

Employees have drug problems. Right now, there are employees on your payroll with drug and alcohol addiction problems. Most are in early or middle stage addiction. Very late stage addiction is obvious, and you may have seen these problems in the past. More problems are coming. It is only a matter of time.

Problems on staff. Statistically, about 5-7% of employees have drug and/or alcohol problems. But about 12-17% of your employees have family members at home or dependents with substance abuse problems....read the rest of this post on my blog at WorkExcel.com

Monday, August 7, 2017

DOT Supervisor Training Test Questions: Making Them Count with Impact and Reduced Risk to the Organization

If you offer DOT supervisor training or provide drug and alcohol training for supervisors for any reason, then it is critical that you give a test at the end of the training. Tests allow supervisors to absorb a bit more of what they learned, and this increases the likelihood they will act on the material. And of course, this reduces risk to the organization, increases referrals to testing, and improves productivity and the bottom line in the long run.

But test questions actually can do much more, and they have a lot more influence in making your drug free workplace training more effective than you may realize.


DOT Supervisor Training Certificate from Reasonable Suspicion Training

DOT Supervisor Training
Test Question Tips

1) Make Test Questions Educational
. Make the test questions in your training program educational. When employees answer the test questions, and check the correct answer, give them more information about the topic and capture this precious moment where you can educate them more thoroughly, offer new information, and having them think more deeply about the concept addressed in the test question on DOT supervisor training.

2) Add DOT Supervisor Training Questions Unrelated to the Content. Don't worry, there is no rule about content in test questions relating to what the supervisor learned in the content of the course. Mix it up. Have questions the supervisor may not know the answer to and make them controversial to inspire interest. Then, as mention above, offer education included in the answer to the question that increases the DOT supervisor's knowledge.


3) Force Correct Answer to Questions. Never allow supervisors to walk away with a so called "passing score" of less than 100%. Can you guess why? The reason is risk management. When a supervisor answers a question that is wrong, supply the correct answer or force the answer on a Web course by making them answer the test question again.

4) Reduce the Audio/Visual Portion of Training.
Because you are using test questions for educational purposes (and I hope handouts and tip sheets that are also required), reduce the audio-visual portion of the program. Nothing from the US DOT requires that audio/visual content itself be 60 minutes/60 minutes. In fact, your course can also include group discussion. How do I know? Well, I phoned the DOT headquarters myself and asked about this question.

Test questions can make your DOT supervisor training a lot more powerful and effective than you realize. And, most importantly, effective training ultimately saves lives.